Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Russian Sleep Experiment


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Ibiza

Ibiza

    Lush queen of reaction picture abuse

  • Twilight
  • PipPip
  • 1,564 posts

Posted 21 August 2011 - 09:14 AM

Now before i post the link, OBVIOUSLY this story is fake. Very obviously. But it got me wondering how people would act in this given situation.
Russian Sleep Experiment

I read somewhere not sleeping for 4 days to a week can kill you (whether this is true or not i won't pretend to know) Besides hallucinations what else do you think might occur, emotionally and mentally if not only you were not allowed to sleep but you were denied your sense. No stimulation at all. I've read actually case stories and hospital stories of similar things and they have provided minimum answers, but i'm curious to know what you all think. : )

(edit- i wasn't sure were the hell to put this, so i apologize if it is in the wrong place it was here or society and culture)

Edited by Ibiza, 21 August 2011 - 09:16 AM.


#2 fatherkabral

fatherkabral

    Nightwalker

  • Darkling
  • Pip
  • 488 posts

Posted 22 August 2011 - 12:45 AM

Insanity. Unquestionably. A week with no sensory input, and no sleep would be horrible torment. Most people would pass out long before then, though...what would you propose as the method for ensuring the subject didn't fall asleep? Drugs?

#3 Ibiza

Ibiza

    Lush queen of reaction picture abuse

  • Twilight
  • PipPip
  • 1,564 posts

Posted 22 August 2011 - 12:52 AM

Insanity. Unquestionably. A week with no sensory input, and no sleep would be horrible torment. Most people would pass out long before then, though...what would you propose as the method for ensuring the subject didn't fall asleep? Drugs?


I would think drugs would have to be the only way to keep them awake. I can't really think of anything else.
I keep referencing back in my teenage years when i would go on 4 or 5 day meth benders and be up for days. The hallucinations and paranoia were intense. I can't imagine being forcibly kept up for that long and being denied interactions with object, people or sounds.

#4 TheUnknowable

TheUnknowable

    Quintisential Questioning Quester

  • Twilight
  • PipPip
  • 3,154 posts

Posted 22 August 2011 - 01:09 PM

sensory deprevation isn't necessarily a bad thing. But when you cut out all sleep as well? I think it would make everything way way more intence. even if you just kept them on an adrinaline drip 24/7 to keep them awake, and therefore removed any drug effects, not slleping for that long would have some pretty wierd effects.

#5 Ibiza

Ibiza

    Lush queen of reaction picture abuse

  • Twilight
  • PipPip
  • 1,564 posts

Posted 22 August 2011 - 02:46 PM

sensory deprevation isn't necessarily a bad thing. But when you cut out all sleep as well? I think it would make everything way way more intence. even if you just kept them on an adrinaline drip 24/7 to keep them awake, and therefore removed any drug effects, not slleping for that long would have some pretty wierd effects.


But could it cause death? i've read so many different things and different opinions.

#6 fatherkabral

fatherkabral

    Nightwalker

  • Darkling
  • Pip
  • 488 posts

Posted 22 August 2011 - 08:07 PM

I imagine it would depend on their physical and mental fitness. Staying up that long is extremely hard on the body and mind.

#7 Skadi

Skadi

    Methuselah

  • Founder
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,140 posts

Posted 23 August 2011 - 08:19 AM

Just look at Fatal Familial Insomnia as an example.


Michael Corke (Michel A Corke)

Shortly after his 40th birthday in 1991, Michael Corke, a music teacher from Chicago, began having trouble sleeping. In the following weeks, the insomnia grew worse and his health rapidly deteriorated. Eventually he couldn’t sleep at all.



Video footage of him appearing at a school orchestra concert revealed a frail old man - a far cry from the fit and healthy individual he was just months earlier. Eventually he was admitted to hospital and doctors diagnosed him with an extremely rare genetic disorder discovered just seven years prior: Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI). Michael Corke died in hospital after six months from a complete lack of sleep.




Patients have been known to survive for up to three years, gradually passing through four stages of illness:
The onset of insomnia, creating panic attacks and unfounded phobias, lasting for four months.

  • Severe insomnia, worsening panic attacks and hallucinations, lasting for five months.
  • Complete insomnia and rapid weight loss, lasting for three months.
  • Dementia and unresponsiveness, lasting for six months. FFI is eventually fatal.


Ten years ago, scientists discovered that Fatal Familial Insomnia is caused by a dual mutation in a gene that codes for proteins. The tell-tale sign of prion diseases is an insoluble protein that causes plaque to develop in the thalamus. This is the region of the brain responsible for the regulation of sleep, as well as sensory and motor systems. As the plaque "eats away" at the brain, the sufferer loses the ability to shut down at night. This manifests in the form of insomnia. The resulting symptoms of FFI are caused by the complete lack of REM and NREM sleep, proving that sleep is vital to everyone.



#8 Ibiza

Ibiza

    Lush queen of reaction picture abuse

  • Twilight
  • PipPip
  • 1,564 posts

Posted 24 August 2011 - 08:32 PM

Thank you skadi!
You might find this interesting : )
http://www.theepocht...tent/view/2855/

#9 Zan

Zan

    Noble

  • Twilight
  • PipPip
  • 3,895 posts

Posted 27 August 2011 - 03:35 AM

Well, it's essentially a combination of this:

After spending 15 minutes deprived of sight and sound, each person completed a test called the “Psychotomimetic States Inventory,” which measures psychosis-like experiences and was originally developed to study recreational drug users.
Among the nine participants who scored high on the first survey, five reported having hallucinations of faces during the sensory deprivation, and six reported seeing other objects or shapes that weren’t there. Four also noted an unusually heightened sense of smell, and two sensed an “evil presence” in the room. Almost all reported that they had “experienced something very special or important” during the experiment.
As expected, volunteers who were less prone to hallucinations experienced fewer perceptual distortions, but they still reported a variety of delusions and hallucinations.
The researchers were not altogether surprised by such dramatic results from only 15 minutes of sensory deprivation. Although few scientists are studying sensory deprivation today, a small body of research from the 1950s and 1960s supports the idea that a lack of sensory input can lead to symptoms of psychosis.
“Sensory deprivation is a naturalistic analogue to drugs like ketamine and cannabis for acting as a psychosis-inducing context,” Mason wrote, “particularly for those prone to psychosis.”

http://www.wired.com...hallucinations/

and this:

Ten rats were subjected to total sleep deprivation (TSD) by the disk apparatus. All TSD rats died or were sacrificed when death seemed imminent within 11-32 days. No anatomical cause of death was identified. All TSD rats showed a debilitated appearance, lesions on their tails and paws, and weight loss in spite of increased food intake. Their yoked control (TSC) rats remained healthy. Since dehydration was ruled out and several measures indicated accelerated use rather than failure to absorb nutrients, the food-weight changes in TSD rats were attributed to increased energy expenditure (EE). The measurement of EE, based upon caloric value of food, weight, and wastes, indicated that all TSD rats increased EE, with mean levels reaching more than twice baseline values.


http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/2928622

Edited by Zan, 27 August 2011 - 03:36 AM.